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  • Retirement Shortfall

    One of the biggest risks to a comfortable retirement is running out of money too soon. This calculator helps you determine your projected shortfall or surplus at retirement. You can also see just how long your current retirement savings will last. If your results project a shortfall, you might need to save more, earn a better rate of return, or possibly delay your retirement. (Please note: This calculator is intended to provide approximate information on loan payments and does not constitute an offer to extend credit. Your actual payment information may vary.)


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    Definitions

    Current retirement savings
    This is your current retirement savings. You should include any savings or investments that are specifically for your retirement. Be careful not to include amounts ear marked for other purposes, such as your children's education. 

    Monthly contributions
    The amount you will contribute each month to your retirement savings. This calculator assumes that you make your contribution at the beginning of each month. We also assume that this amount remains constant until you retire.
    Years before you retire
    The number of years you have to save before your retirement. If you are planning on retiring immediately, you should enter a zero.
    Number of years in retirement
    The number of years you expect to spend in retirement. If this retirement savings plan is intended to support you and your spouse, make sure this is long enough years to account for your spouse's potentially longer lifespan.
    Annual retirement expenses
    Your after tax retirement expenses. Since this calculator assumes that you will be paying income taxes on interest as it is earned, your expenses should be entered on an after tax basis. Your retirement expenses are increased each year by your expected inflation rate if the "Increase expenses with inflation" box is checked.
    Expected inflation rate
    What you expect for the average long-term inflation rate. A common measure of inflation in the U.S. is the Consumer Price Index (CPI), which has a long-term average of 3.1% annually, from 1925 through 2005.
    Rate of return before retirement
    This is the annually compounded rate of return you expect from your investments before taxes. The actual rate of return is largely dependant on the type of investments you select. From January 1970 to December 2005, the average compounded rate of return for the S&P 500, including reinvestment of dividends, was approximately 11.4% per year. During this period, the highest 12-month return was 61%, and the lowest was -39%. Savings accounts at a bank pay as little as 1% or less.
    It is important to remember that future rates of return can't be predicted with certainty and that investments that pay higher rates of return are subject to higher risk and volatility. The actual rate of return on investments can vary widely over time, especially for long-term investments. This includes the potential loss of principal on your investment. It is not possible to invest directly in an index and the compounded rate of return noted above does not reflect additional sales charges and fees that funds may charge.
    Rate of return during retirement
    This is the annual rate of return you expect from your investments during retirement. It is often lower than the return earned before retirement due to more conservative investment choices to help insure a steady flow of income. The actual rate of return is largely dependant on the type of investments you select. From January 1970 to December 2005, the average compounded rate of return for the S&P 500, including reinvestment of dividends, was approximately 11.4% per year. During this period, the highest 12-month return was 61%, and the lowest was -39%. Savings accounts at a bank pay as little as 1% or less. It is important to remember that future rates of return can't be predicted with certainty and that investments that pay higher rates of return are subject to higher risk and volatility. The actual rate of return on investments can vary widely over time, especially for long-term investments. This includes the potential loss of principal on your investment. It is not possible to invest directly in an index and the compounded rate of return noted above does not reflect additional sales charges and fees that funds may charge. 
    Federal tax rate
    Your marginal federal tax rate.
    State tax rate
    Your marginal state tax rate.  

    Information and interactive calculators are made available to you as self-help tools for your independent use. We cannot and do not guarantee their accuracy or their applicability to your circumstances. All calculations are based on user inputs and do not reflect any guarantee or commitment of the loan, interest rate, expected savings or tax advantage. We encourage you to seek personalized advice from qualified professionals regarding all personal finance issues.